The Ontario SPCA and Humane Society helps 36 Northern cats find new homes

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Stouffville, (May 16, 2022) – The Ontario SPCA and Humane Society welcomed 36 Northern cats today as part of a re-homing partnership to bring these feline friends to areas of the province where there are families waiting to adopt.  

The cat transfer took place in partnership with the Second Chance Pet Network in Dryden, 

located approximately 1,300 kilometres north of Sudbury, to help make room for other animals at the Northern shelter. In many Northern communities, there are more adoptable animals than there are families who can give them homes. 

 Once ready for adoption, the cats will be available through the Ontario SPCA Provincial Education & Animal Centre in Stouffville, the Sudbury & District Animal Centre, the Ontario SPCA Barrie Animal Centre and the Ontario SPCA Midland & District Animal Centre. Animals adopted through the Ontario SPCA are spayed or neutered, vaccinated and microchipped. 

“By working together, we are able to find animals homes in areas of the province where families are waiting to adopt a furry family member,” says Arista Wogenstahl, Transfer Team Lead, Community Outreach Services, Ontario SPCA and Humane Society. “Through this re-homing mission, these cats will find loving homes and the Second Chance Pet Network will have the capacity to assist more animals who need sheltering and care in the North.” 

“Second Chance Pet Network faces some unique issues in helping people and their animals, whether it be with medical care, people having to surrender animals or trying to find good homes for them,” says Ann Owens, Founder and Director, Second Chance Pet Network. “We also have a large problem with community/feral cats and newborn kittens. We are so profoundly grateful to the Ontario SPCA for taking these animals that once had a home and placing them into their animal centres where they have a much better chance of finding new homes. We also would not be able to care for the number of feral colonies that we have if not for all the food the Ontario SPCA sends us. We are so happy to have their support!”
 

A lack of access to basic animal wellness services, such as veterinarians and spay/neuter services, has contributed to an increase in animal populations across Northern Canada. The Ontario SPCA and its partners work alongside communities to deliver much-needed resources, such as food and mobile wellness services, and to manage animal populations through spay/neuter and re-homing initiatives. 

Interested in adopting? Visit ontariospca.ca/adopt to meet animals available for adoption.  

   

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MEDIA CONTACT 

Media Relations   

Ontario SPCA and Humane Society    

905-898-7122 x 375  

media@ontariospca.ca 

The Ontario SPCA and Humane Society  

The Ontario SPCA and Humane Society is a registered charity, established in 1873. The Society and its network of communities facilitate and provide for province-wide leadership on matters relating to the prevention of cruelty to animals and the promotion of animal well-being. Offering a variety of mission-based programs, including community-based sheltering, animal wellness services, provincial animal transfers, shelter health & wellness, high-volume spay/neuter services, animal rescue, animal advocacy, Indigenous partnership programs and  

The Ontario SPCA and Humane Society Provincial Office sits on the traditional territory of the Wendat, the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Mississaugas of Scugog, Hiawatha and Alderville First Nations and the Métis Nation. This territory was the subject of the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes. The treaties that were signed for this particular parcel of land are collectively referred to as the Williams Treaties of 1923. 

 

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